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Author Topic: Kenya: Riots erupt after Presidential elections (merged topic)  (Read 15303 times)
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wind5001
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I'm a Kiva customer tho Kiva thinks I'm a donor.

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« Reply To This #20 on: January 05, 2008, 03:51:24 PM »

Nicole,

I guess this was the point I was trying to make...thanks for clearing that up. I haven't read Yunus' book, but I think it is high time by now... Smiley
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Nicole & Hiren
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« Reply To This #21 on: January 05, 2008, 04:08:19 PM »

Nicole,

I guess this was the point I was trying to make...thanks for clearing that up. I haven't read Yunus' book, but I think it is high time by now... Smiley

Oh, gosh, I've learned so much from this book! I'm actually listening to it on CD--I borrowed it from the library. If anyone doesn't have time to actually "read" it, please listen to it. I think that anyone who is serious about microlending should educate themselves through Yunus' experience. I now understand the importance of group loans and loans to improve housing. I'm also more discerning in my lending, which is a personal choice that I won't try to foist on others; I'll be happy to share my ideas through PM if anyone in interested.

Please, please, get thee to a library or a bookstore and get this book!   

Runner Reading....

Nicole
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"We are visitors on this planet. We are here for 90 or 100 years at the very most. During that period, we must try to do something good, something useful, with our lives. If you contribute to other people's happiness, you will find the true goal, the true meaning of life." ~ HH, the 14th Dalai Lama
Jill
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« Reply To This #22 on: January 09, 2008, 02:05:36 AM »

http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-fg-kenya8jan08,1,1324864.story?[url=http://coll=la-news-a_section]coll=la-news-a_section]http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-fg-kenya8jan08,1,1324864.story?[url=http://coll=la-news-a_section]coll=la-news-a_section]coll=la-news-a_section]http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-fg-kenya8jan08,1,1324864.story?[url=http://coll=la-news-a_section]coll=la-news-a_section]coll=la-news-a_section]coll=la-news-a_section]http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-fg-kenya8jan08,1,1324864.story?[url]coll=la-news-a_section]coll=la-news-a_section]coll=la-news-a_section]coll=la-news-a_section]coll=la-news-a_section]http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-fg-kenya8jan08,1,1324864.story?[url]coll=la-news-a_section
http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/Kenya-Elections-Africa-Nairobi-Kenya-Raila-Odinga-President-Mwai-Kibaki/ss/events/wl/123007kenyaelections/s:/ap/20080107/ap_on_re_af/kenya_elections#/080107/481/9856451c6dc146f993f99d613cd34625
Pic #1 -- People from the Kikuyu tribe sit in a truck as they flee Eldoret under military protection passing Cheptiret village January 4, 2008. Kenyans across the political divide prayed for peace on Sunday while aid workers sought to bring relief to an estimated 250,000 refugees from post-election violence that has also killed hundreds. Picture taken January 4, 2008.

Pic #2 -- More people from the Kikuyu tribe fleeing to escape the violence
Pic # 3 - A woman cowers as a paramilitary police officer uses a stick to get her to move.
                   (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)


Pic #4 - Kenyans displaced by post-election violence await the distribution of aid at Burnt Forest Church near Eldoret, about 306 km northwest of Nairobi, January 7, 2008.


Pic #5 - Margaret Wawira Wanjiru sits amid the rubble of what was her home. She lost everything she owned.
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)


Pic #6 -- Margaret Wanjiru -- one of Kiva's Entrepreneurs.           
                                             http://www.kiva.org/app.php?page=businesses&action=about&id=7501
                  The name, when I saw it at the Times website, looked familiar, so I looked it up at Kiva, and sure enough, I found
                  an Entrepreneur with the same name.   This woman, Kiva's entrepreneur, probably is NOT the same woman as was pictured 
                  in the Los Angeles Times pic #5, just above.  Turns out the name, Wanjiru, is really common in Kenya -- just happened
                  to discover it came from a Kikuyu fable about "the most beautiful girl in the land," the meaning of the name.
                  Still,  I kept looking, looking, looking and comparing the pictures, not sure. And looking again.  They're similar enough,
                  at least, to my eyes.
                   Haunting.  Haunted.   Really haunted by the possibility that it could have been. 

                 Though, of course, it makes no difference, really.
                 Whether the people who have lost their lives or their loved ones or their livelihoods or their homes are our entrepreneurs
                 or not, they could be our entrepreneurs; they could be our family or our friends -- they could be us.
                 We don't have to ask, anymore, for whom that bell is tolling.
                 We're here because we know that it's tolling for us.



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« Last Edit: January 09, 2008, 02:11:52 AM by Jill » Logged
Steff
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« Reply To This #23 on: January 12, 2008, 02:19:18 PM »

I just received an on-time payment from a lady in Rongo, Kenya so I am hoping things are at least half-way back to normal there.
Steff
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Peter S
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« Reply To This #24 on: January 16, 2008, 12:25:56 PM »

Google News alerts just brought me possibly the most vivid and distressing account I've seen of events in Kenya.  A January 13th report by Robyn Dixon of the LA Times that brings home the intensity and ferocity of the Luo / Kikuyu conflict.

Cut down for crossing an invisible line
In Kenya's tribal violence, neighbors turn on each other with machetes. One Luo man is attacked in a Kikuyu area where he could have walked with impunity a week earlier
.

3-page version here at the LA Times (their single page option doesn't want to work for me)
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-machete13jan13,1,3193139.story?page=1&cset=true&ctrack=1&coll=la-headlines-world

or a single-page syndicated full reprint at the Otago Daily Times of New Zealand
http://www.odt.co.nz/article.php?refid=2008,01,17,8,00800,2055f2050d161cd60aa1da89fd1aaa45&sect=3

P
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verba volant, littera scripta manet
KivanSteven
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« Reply To This #25 on: January 17, 2008, 11:48:37 AM »

Update on results of violence:   

"In three weeks since the vote, violence...has caused about 620 deaths.
A quarter of a million people, mostly from Kibaki’s Kikuyu tribe, have been turned into refugees."

Released by Reuters 1/17/08, about 10:40am EST
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I find not direction in the readings of those with whom my eccentricities are similar, but rather validation.

My only solace is that I find a peaceful place where I might be resigned to my depriving loneliness.
Peter S
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« Reply To This #26 on: January 25, 2008, 01:19:06 AM »


some of the wider consequences of the post-election violence in Kenya...

Poaching in Kenya may increase because of crisis: NGO
Quote
Images of people hacking each other to death and reports of women and children being burned alive in a church dealt a huge blow to the tourism industry, Kenya's main source of foreign currency.

Around 90 percent of accommodation bookings for January were cancelled, hitting the country's economy during the tourism high season.

The NGO [WildlifeDirect.org], chaired by conservationist Richard Leakey, explained that many people were expecting to turn to poaching for bushmeat trade if they lost their jobs in the tourism sector.
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5iXzbL_oXFquiE1pf0XN1vR_OSSPg


Kenya leaders meet and pledge peace as economy grinds to a halt
Quote
More than 650 people have died since President Kibaki was sworn in for a second term and the conflict threatens to stall East Africa’s most successful economy. The boom years seem to be over as tea fields stand unpicked, railways are silent and thousands of workers flee their homes and jobs.

Terry Ryan, adviser to the Kenyan Central Bank, said that economic growth might be as low as 2 per cent after expanding by 7 per cent for five successive years.

Tourism has been the most obvious economic casualty. Hotels stand empty on Kenya’s splendid beaches, the tourists scared away by television images of marauding tribal gangs.
. . .
The tourism industry is the biggest earner of foreign currency and was expected to make £500 million this year. The Kenya Tourist Board believes that the figure will be halved and 120,000 jobs will be lost by March.

Thousands of British holidaymakers were forced to cancel their trips when the Foreign Office advised against all-but-essential travel. Charter flights arrived empty and left packed with tourists who cut short their holidays.

The squeeze on tourism has also had an effect on one of Kenya’s other booming sectors: flowers. Almost two thirds of exports to Europe are flown as cargo on returning passenger aircraft; the Fresh Produce Exporters Association of Kenya says that it has lost 20 per cent of its capacity, because dozens of flights have been cancelled.

Kenya’s crisis has also sent ripples through the rest of East Africa. The World Bank estimates that a quarter of the GDP of Rwanda and Uganda, and a third of Burundi’s GDP, passes through Kenya, mostly through the port of Mombasa. Uganda, which estimates that it is losing £600,000 a day in tax revenues, has had to ration petrol, as has Rwanda.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/africa/article3248539.ece


Kenya Isn’t Rwanda (By Josh Ruxin)
Quote
. . .Here are some of the repercussions, both immediate and far-reaching, of Kenya’s debacle:

1) Fuel. Shortages are spreading across Kenya and will spread to neighboring countries that rely on its ports. Rwanda, Burundi and Uganda are particularly susceptible. And don’t forget, that fuel provides much of the region’s electricity as well.

2) Tourism. The world’s largest industry is Kenya’s cash cow, but for the time being and for years to come, it will be seriously impacted. Since many package tours to Kenya include visits to neighboring countries, regional tourism will be hit hard as well.

3) International organizations. Nairobi is home to offices of the United Nations and to virtually every international organization to be found in East Africa. Increased insecurity over the last several years has imposed an enormous tax on doing business there. Now these organizations may look abroad for more secure surroundings.

4) International investment. Investors have flocked to Kenya because of its vibrant-in-spite-of-corruption private sector. The prospect of seeing investments demolished by violence and instability will deter future investment. Furthermore, it will force investors to think again before considering capital investments in nations where democracy and development are not flourishing.
. . .
the dimensions of the Kenyan situation will have regional and long-lasting consequences. Cancel that safari trip. Move out of emerging African market funds. You can hear the sound of progress being sucked down the drain.
http://kristof.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/01/04/kenya-isnt-rwanda/
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verba volant, littera scripta manet
Jill
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« Reply To This #27 on: January 28, 2008, 04:56:04 PM »

    Oh, God.

     I just glanced at a news headline about Kenya, saw the name of a town I thought I recognized, Kisumu, and went to my profile, loan portfolio, whatever you call it, to check some of my Kenyan loans to see if any of my people were from Kisumu, the most recent locale for atrocities I couldn't keep reading about.   http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080128/ap_on_re_af/kenya_election_violence

     I got as far as scanning to see a line about "thousands of machete-wielding youths" and about someone getting stoned to death, and then,
I just stopped.

     Some of you already know what it took me looking at my portfolio to confirm: one of our Field Partners is called
Kisumu Medical and Education Trust.  Turns out I have loans with fifteen people there.

     This (getting "connected") stuff really really hurts.

     I'm not much of a pray-er, but it's feeling like one of those times....

     I don't know what else to say.

peace
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
EDIT:
       As a moth to the flame, I went back to the article, trying (unsuccessfully, turns out) to read it without reading, without seeing, I mean, the stuff that was going to be too hard to see.  The incongruity, the incompatibility of the images described in the following just jumped out at me:

".... Naivasha, Kenya's flower-exporting capital on a freshwater lake inhabited by pink flamingoes, became a war zone Monday where some 2,000 people from rival tribes faced off, taunting each other with machetes and clubs inset with nails...."

     
« Last Edit: January 28, 2008, 05:26:49 PM by Jill » Logged
KivanSteven
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« Reply To This #28 on: January 28, 2008, 05:33:47 PM »

Im sorry to hear that all Jill, distressing is hardly the word.  What can you do but feel helpless when a quite peaceful and civilized country rolls everything back and the decades long process of re-stabilizing, re-building, and reconciling must begin all over. 

I was recently reading that the "President's" own tribe is now turning the tide of aggression towards the original groups that so violently protested the election.  Im surprised with the graphic language the news organizations are using to describe the violence, which I wont use here because its very descriptive, and makes it all the more troubling from a visually imagined aspect.
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I find not direction in the readings of those with whom my eccentricities are similar, but rather validation.

My only solace is that I find a peaceful place where I might be resigned to my depriving loneliness.
Jill
Guest
« Reply To This #29 on: January 29, 2008, 03:34:19 PM »

            Can’t seem to get away from how personal what is happening over in Kenya feels for me, and I think, for a lot of us.  It’s something that borders on wondrous, how connected Kiva has enabled us to feel to people, some, on the other side of the world from us – and in such a relatively short time, too.  I said, “borders on wondrous” when speaking of the connections we feel.  That there’s a flip side to all that, in the pain and helplessness a lot of us now are feeling, apparently comes with the territory --- of caring about other human beings.

       Just now came across another article about what’s going on, from which I'm posting excerpts, including most of the last three paragraphs of the article because I thought they might be of particular interest.  You can go to the link to read the whole thing if you'd prefer.
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1707857,00.html

“….The violence has pitted members of Kibaki's Kikuyu tribe, long accused of being the object of favors from successive Kenyan governments, against Luos, Luhyas and Kalenjin, which had hoped an Odinga victory in the December 27 election would right decades of perceived injustices.

       Indeed, the fear was that the violence would begin to spiral out of control into a cycle of ethnic attacks as members of Kenya's different ethnic groups act on grievances they have harbored for decades over land and the perceived inequitable distribution of resources. That, in turn, could sink Kenya's economy, whose chief engines are horticulture, tourism and tea. All three industries have been crippled.

Still, amid the violence, there was some hope that Annan's mediation could lead to a compromise at last after a month of bloodletting. The death toll is now difficult to estimate, but it is believed that some 850 people have been killed since the vote, with about 150 of them killed since Friday, when Kikuyus launched what appeared to have been revenge attacks in Nakuru. "Today our country is under serious threat of sliding into anarchy," parliamentary speaker Kenneth Marende said.

The one thing that Kenya has going for it right now, it seems, is that the world is refusing to let the crisis fade into the background. The African Union has promised to consider the issue in a summit that begins on Thursday. And the special U.N. adviser on preventing genocide, Francis Deng, has warned that Kenya's politicians could be held responsible for any violation of international law. That came just days after the New York-based Human Rights Watch released a report concluding that there was some indication that the violence had been planned beforehand..."


            Let there be peace on earth, and please, let there, very very soon, be peace, again, in Kenya….

NOTE: I didn't know where to post this since we now have a proliferation of threads pertaining to Kenya.  I thought I should try to leave the
         Ebony Foundation Fund thread to be about news related to Ebony and our Entrepreneurs with Ebony, and the fund, itself, but I wasn't sure.

         If anyone has any ideas about how we can help ensure that the world continues to "refuse to let the crisis fade into the background,"
         I think a number of us would appreciate any guidance someone could give as to something "constructive" we might be able to do, in
         addition to participating in fund-raising endeavors here, if as nothing else, a partial antidote to the pain and feeling of helplessness.


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