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Author Topic: UGANDA  (Read 21169 times)
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Natasha
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« on: February 08, 2008, 06:45:56 PM »

Bwindi National Park

Bwindi National park has 90 mammal species, including 11 primates, of which the black-and-white colobus, with its lovely flowing white tail, is prominent. It is also home to (approximately) half of the world's mountain gorillas.

http://www.uwa.or.ug/bwindi.html

Nkuringo Group in Bwindi National Park (4.32 minutes)


« Last Edit: February 08, 2008, 06:47:25 PM by Natasha » Logged
Claus-Peter
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« Reply To This #1 on: February 10, 2008, 02:57:40 AM »

Maps of Uganda:








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Claus-Peter
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« Reply To This #2 on: February 10, 2008, 03:10:43 AM »

The Flag of Uganda:


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Claus-Peter
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« Reply To This #3 on: February 10, 2008, 03:46:01 AM »

The history of Uganda:


The earliest known human inhabitants in contemporary Uganda were hunter gatherers. Between about 2000 and 1500 years ago Bantu speaking populations, who were probably from central and western Africa, migrated to the southern parts of the country.[4][5] These groups brought and developed ironworking skills and new ideas of social and political organization. The Empire of Kitara in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries represents the earliest forms of formal organization, followed by the kingdom of Bunyoro-Kitara, and, later, Buganda and Ankole in later centuries.[6]

Nilotic people including Luo and Ateker entered the area from the north, probably beginning about A.D. 120. They were cattle herders and subsistence farmers who settled mainly the northern and eastern parts of the country. Some Luo invaded the area of Bunyoro and assimilated with the Bantu there, establishing the Babiito dynasty of the current Omukama (ruler) of Bunyoro-Kitara.[7] Luo migration proceeded until the 16th century, with some Luo settling amid Bantu people in Eastern Uganda, with others proceeding to the western shores of Lake Victoria in Kenya and Tanzania. The Ateker (Karimojong and Teso) settled in the north-eastern and eastern parts of the country, and some fused with the Luo in the area north of Lake Kyoga.

Arab traders moved inland from the Indian Ocean coast of East Africa in the 1830s. They were followed in the 1860s by British explorers searching for the source of the Nile. Protestant missionaries entered the country in 1877, followed by Catholic missionaries in 1879.[8] The United Kingdom placed the area under the charter of the British East Africa Company in 1888, and ruled it as a protectorate from 1894. As several other territories and chiefdoms were integrated, the final protectorate called Uganda took shape in 1914.

Uganda became an independent nation in 1962, with Milton Obote as Executive Prime Minister. The constitution was changed in 1963 to satisfy an alliance between Uganda People Congress and Kabaka Yekka Party, during the elections in 1962. This created a post of a titular Head of State called the President and a position of a Vice President. The UPC government appointed Edward Muteesa II, Kabaka (King) of Buganda, as the President and Commander in Chief of the armed forces. William Wilberforce Nadiope, the Kyabazing of Busoga, (paramount chief), was appointed Vice President. In 1966, Obote overthrew the king. A UPC-dominated Parliament changed the constitution, and Obote became president. The elections were suspended, ushering in an era of coups and counter-coups, which would last until the mid-1980s. Obote was deposed twice from office, both times by military coup.

Idi Amin took power in 1971, ruling the country with the military for the coming decade.[9] Idi Amin's rule cost an estimated 300,000 Ugandans' lives. He forcibly removed the entrepreneurial Indian minority from Uganda, decimating the economy. His reign was ended after the Uganda-Tanzania War in 1979 in which Tanzanian forces aided by Ugandan exiles invaded Uganda. This led to the return of Obote, who was deposed once more in 1985 by General Tito Okello. Okello ruled for six months until he was deposed after the so called "bush war" by the National Resistance Army (NRM) operating under the leadership of the current president, Yoweri Museveni, and various rebel groups, including Federal Democratic Movement of Andrew Kayiira, and another belonging to John Nkwanga.

Museveni has been in power since 1986. In the mid to late 1990s, he was lauded by the West as part of a new generation of African leaders. His presidency has been fouled, however, by involvement in the civil war in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and other conflicts in the Great Lakes region, as well as the civil war against the Lord's Resistance Army. In 2007, Uganda deployed soldiers to the African Union peacekeeping mission in Somalia.

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Claus-Peter
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« Reply To This #4 on: February 10, 2008, 03:50:22 AM »

Uganda is divided into 80 districts[1] across four administrative regions. Most districts are named after their main commercial and administrative towns. Eleven new districts came into being on 1 July 2006.

Each district is further divided into sub-districts, counties, sub-counties, parishes and villages. The head elected official in a district is the Chairperson of the Local Council V.

Below are population figures from the 2002 Census. County data was used to determine figures for the districts created or altered since 1 July 2005.

Link to districts map and the population figures:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Districts_of_Uganda




« Last Edit: February 10, 2008, 03:51:36 AM by Claus-Peter » Logged
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« Reply To This #5 on: February 10, 2008, 03:56:22 AM »

A really great place to be is Lake Victoria:


Lake Victoria or Victoria Nyanza (also known as Ukerewe and Nalubaale) is one of the Great Lakes of Africa.

Lake Victoria is 68,800 square kilometres (26,560 mi²) in size, making it the continent's largest lake, the largest tropical lake in the world, and the second largest fresh water lake in the world in terms of surface area (third largest if one considers Lake Michigan-Huron as a single lake). Being relatively shallow for its size, with a maximum depth of 84 m (276 ft) and a mean depth of 40 m (131 ft), Lake Victoria ranks as the seventh largest freshwater lake by volume, containing 2,750 cubic kilometres (2.2 million acre-feet) of water. It is the source of the longest branch of the Nile River, the White Nile, and has a water catchment area of 184,000 square kilometres (71,040 mi²). It is a biological hotspot with great biodiversity.[1] The lake lies within an elevated plateau in the western part of Africa's Great Rift Valley and is subject to territorial administration by Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya. The lake has a shoreline of 3,440 km (2138 miles), and has more than 3,000 islands, many of which are inhabited. These include the Ssese Islands in Uganda, a large group of islands in the northwest of the Lake that are becoming a popular destination for tourists.


Lake Victoria is relatively young; its current basin formed only 400,000 years ago, when westward-flowing rivers were dammed by an upthrown crustal block.[2] The lake's shallowness, limited river inflow, and large surface area relative to its volume make it vulnerable to climate changes; cores taken from its bottom show that Lake Victoria has dried up completely three times since it formed.[3] These drying cycles are probably related to past ice ages, which are times when precipitation declined globally.[4] The lake last dried out 17,300 years ago, and filled again beginning 14,700 years ago; the fantastic adaptive radiation of its native cichlids has taken place in the short period of time since then.[5]


For more details about the fish spezies and some lovely pictures refer to:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Victoria

« Last Edit: February 10, 2008, 03:56:43 AM by Claus-Peter » Logged
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« Reply To This #6 on: February 10, 2008, 04:03:29 AM »

Not only Lake Victoria is a lovely place ... Even if this site is tourist advertisement, it shows the visitors much of the beauty of the country.











Uganda an elegant adventure
 
From the moment you land at Entebbe’s modern and efficient international airport, with its breathtaking equatorial location on the forested shore of island-strewn Lake Victoria, it is clear that Uganda is no ordinary safari destination. Dominated by an expansive golf course leading down to the lakeshore, and a century-old botanical garden alive with the chatter of acrobatic monkeys and colourful tropical birds, Entebbe itself is the least obviously urban of all comparably sized African towns. Then, just 40km distant, sprawled across seven hills, there is the capital Kampala. The bright modern feel of this bustling, cosmopolitan city reflects the ongoing economic growth and political stability that has characterised Uganda since 1986, and is complemented by the sloping spaciousness and runaway greenery of its garden setting.

Ecologically, Uganda is where the East African savannah meets the West African jungle. Where else but in this impossibly lush country can one observe lions prowling the open plains in the morning and track chimpanzees through the rainforest undergrowth the same afternoon, then the next day navigate tropical channels teeming with hippo and crocs before setting off into the misty mountains to stare deep into the eyes of a mountain gorilla? Certainly, Uganda is the only safari destination whose range of forest primates is as impressive as its selection of plains antelope. And this verdant biodiversity is further attested to by Uganda’s status as by far the smallest of the four African countries whose bird checklist tops the 1,000 mark!

Yet there is more to the country than wildlife – far more! There is the mighty Nile, punctuated by the spectacular Murchison Falls, and the setting for some of the world’s most thrilling commercial white-water rafting. There are the snow-capped peaks of the Rwenzori, which provide a tantalising challenge to dedicated mountaineers, as well as the Virunga Volcanoes and Mount Elgon, both of which offer highly rewarding hiking opportunities through scintillating highland scenery. More sedately, the myriad islands of Lake Victoria and Bunyonyi are idyllic venues, as are the myriad forest-fringed crater lakes that stud the rift valley floor and escarpment around Fort Portal. Whether you’re a first time safari-goer or a seasoned African traveller, Uganda – with its unique blend of savannah and forest creatures, its rare wealth of montane and lake habitats – is simply dazzling.

Africa’s Friendliest Country

Uganda’s reputation as ‘Africa’s Friendliest Country’ stems partly from the tradition of hospitality common to its culturally diverse populace, and partly from the remarkably low level of crime and hassle directed at tourists. But this amiable quality extends beyond the easygoing people. Uganda’s eco-friendliness is attested to by the creation of six new national parks under the present administration, as well as a recent mushrooming of community-based eco-tourism projects at the grassroots level, while the mood of social enlightenment is characterised by the progressive and much lauded policies towards curbing the spread of HIV/AIDS and promoting women’s rights. The climate, too, is highly agreeable, reflecting the combination of an equatorial location and medium to high altitudes, while amenities such as hotels and game lodges now rank with the very best Africa has to offer.


For further reference about tourism in Uganda refer to:


http://www.visituganda.com/home.html

 
« Last Edit: February 10, 2008, 04:08:12 AM by Claus-Peter » Logged
Claus-Peter
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« Reply To This #7 on: February 10, 2008, 04:07:35 AM »

Some background information about Uganda from the CIA factbook:


The colonial boundaries created by Britain to delimit Uganda grouped together a wide range of ethnic groups with different political systems and cultures. These differences prevented the establishment of a working political community after independence was achieved in 1962. The dictatorial regime of Idi AMIN (1971-79) was responsible for the deaths of some 300,000 opponents; guerrilla war and human rights abuses under Milton OBOTE (1980-85) claimed at least another 100,000 lives. The rule of Yoweri MUSEVENI since 1986 has brought relative stability and economic growth to Uganda. During the 1990s, the government promulgated non-party presidential and legislative elections.


For more details refer to:


https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ug.html
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« Reply To This #8 on: February 10, 2008, 04:14:13 AM »

Some more tourist stuff from lonely planet about Uganda:


Newly invigorated and raring to go, Uganda is worth a fresh-eyed look.

Travellers are flocking to Uganda's beautiful mountains, trekking opportunities and communities of mountain gorillas. Kampala is now the modern, bustling capital of a new Uganda, a country with one of the fastest growing economies in Africa.














When to go

The best time to visit Uganda is late December to late February, as this time of year is generally dry (though hot). A close second is the June to September period. Don't even think about trekking outside of these dry months.

Travel Warning: Dangerous Areas

Although much of Uganda is generally safe, there are some risky areas. The Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) is still active north of Murchison Falls National Park and around towns such as Lira and Gulu. These areas should be avoided. The border with Democratic Republic of Congo should also be avoided. The remote Karamoja region in the northeast is also prone to violence and banditry. It is imperative to make inquiries with knowledgeable local authorities before setting off to these areas.

severity: High-level alert


For further reference:


http://www.lonelyplanet.com/worldguide/uganda/


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« Reply To This #9 on: February 11, 2008, 01:23:22 AM »

Amnesty International 2007 Report: Uganda

Attachment: Report (3 page word document)


REPUBLIC OF UGANDA
Head of state and government: Yoder Kaput Museveni
Death penalty: retentions
International Criminal Court: ratified


There was progress in peace talks in Southern Sudan between the government and the armed group, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), promising a possible end to 20 years of conflict in northern Uganda.

Elections passed off relatively peacefully. Opposition presidential candidate Dr Kizza Besigye was acquitted of rape but continued to face treason charges. Attacks on freedom of expression and press freedom continued, as did reports of torture of detainees and harassment of people on account of their sexual orientation. Violence against women was widespread. Military courts continued to impose death sentences.
http://www.amnesty.org/

* Ammensty International 2007 Report Uganda.doc (43 KB - downloaded 212 times.)
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