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Author Topic: Kiva Friends and the Books They Love  (Read 62191 times)
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Jan & John
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« Reply To This #250 on: August 06, 2010, 12:32:10 PM »





 Thumbs Up  thanks for posting that Jill...

I just listened to the whole 48 minutes...

... much better than listening to the radio spewing noise...

It was worth every minute and makes me stand taller and just get on with it !!!

-jan-
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« Reply To This #251 on: August 06, 2010, 01:05:09 PM »

Ditto Jan!  Father Boyle is a dynamic speaker who really comes from the heart.
He inspires one to see that there is good in people even if it is hard to find.

Thanks for posting Jill!  Thumbs Up
Bernice
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Jill
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« Reply To This #252 on: March 23, 2011, 04:52:38 PM »

I haven’t read either one of these books….. yet.
But I was just over at a website that I would highly recommend to you, takepart.com, where I learned of the existence of the first of these two books.
Little Princes: One Man's Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal


That led me to take a quick trip over to Amazon, where I chanced on the second one,
The Dressmaker of Khair Khana: Five Sisters, One Remarkable Family, and the Woman Who Risked Everything to Keep Them Safe

Both look really inviting.  They’re about Kiva Countries, Nepal and Afghanistan.  They’re about caring people and the incredible things that caring people having enough commitment and resources (internal and/or external, more tangible kinds of resources), about the amazing things people can and sometimes do accomplish.  And that they accomplish largely and simply because they care.  They care a lot.

Whoever ends up reading one or the other of these first, if you should happen to find it particularly special, then consider, if you would, maybe coming back here to post, just to share and encourage others to partake of the (I’m hoping) joy and inspiration of them, would you?

EDIT: You might want to take note of who happens to be on the front cover of the second book, weighing in with his approval and high recommendation of it. Imagine how thrilled you'd feel if you were the author and you were able to get this guy helping to push your book!


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« Last Edit: March 23, 2011, 05:09:03 PM by Jill » Logged
Amy-in-PHX
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« Reply To This #253 on: March 23, 2011, 05:32:31 PM »

I haven’t read either one of these books….. yet.
But I was just over at a website that I would highly recommend to you, takepart.com, where I learned of the existence of the first of these two books.
Little Princes: One Man's Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal


That led me to take a quick trip over to Amazon, where I chanced on the second one,
The Dressmaker of Khair Khana: Five Sisters, One Remarkable Family, and the Woman Who Risked Everything to Keep Them Safe

Both look really inviting.  They’re about Kiva Countries, Nepal and Afghanistan.  They’re about caring people and the incredible things that caring people having enough commitment and resources (internal and/or external, more tangible kinds of resources), about the amazing things people can and sometimes do accomplish.  And that they accomplish largely and simply because they care.  They care a lot.

Whoever ends up reading one or the other of these first, if you should happen to find it particularly special, then consider, if you would, maybe coming back here to post, just to share and encourage others to partake of the (I’m hoping) joy and inspiration of them, would you?

EDIT: You might want to take note of who happens to be on the front cover of the second book, weighing in with his approval and high recommendation of it. Imagine how thrilled you'd feel if you were the author and you were able to get this guy helping to push your book!


The author of The Dressmaker was just interviewed by Diane Rehm on NPR.  The interview can be heard at this url:  http://thedianerehmshow.org/shows/2011-03-17/gayle-tzemach-lemmon-dressmaker-khair-khana.  I definitely intend to read that book, but may have to wait a year for the price to go down.  It sounds excellent!

There's a book about women in Nepal called "The Violet Sadness of Their Eyes," which I read back in the mid-90's, that was also quite good, for learning more about what life is like for ordinary women in that country.  (Unfortunately I lent it to a friend and never got it back, but the fact I still remember the book 15 years later is evidence of how touching it was, to me.)

EDIT:  Well, I went to Amazon and discovered that the price of The Dressmaker is actually quite reasonable - It is discounted already!  I got it for my Kindle.  Thanks, Jill, for reminding me to look into buying it.  Re Little Princes, I got just the free 1st chapter - but the reviews make me think I will be buying that one, as well.  Sounds like a great story.  Thanks for that recommendation, also.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2011, 06:34:37 PM by Amy-in-PHX » Logged

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« Reply To This #254 on: March 27, 2011, 04:11:11 PM »

Three New Books Highlight Female Entrepreneurship
By ADRIANA GARDELLA

http://boss.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/26/three-new-books-highlight-female-entrepreneurship/

Recently, I came across three new books that explore very different female entrepreneurship experiences. In The Dressmaker of Khair Khana, Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, who has an M.B.A. from Harvard and extensive experience writing about female entrepreneurs in war zones, tells the story of Kamila Sidiqi, who built a thriving dressmaking business in Afghanistan while living under Taliban rule.

Ms. Lemmon vividly describes the day-to-day realities that confronted the educated professional women of Kabul in 1996 when they were, essentially, placed under house arrest by the Taliban — forced to quit their jobs, don burqas, and avoid being seen in public without a male family member.

Under these circumstances, Ms. Sidiqi, then a 19-year-old teaching school graduate about to begin university studies, started a business from her living room that ultimately supported her parents and 10 siblings and employed 100 neighborhood women who otherwise would have  had no income. “We’re far more accustomed to — and comfortable with — seeing women portrayed as victims of war who deserve our sympathy rather than as resilient survivors who demand our respect,” writes Ms. Lemmon, who learned that Ms. Sidiqi was one of many women who found innovative ways to work during the Taliban years. With this book, Ms. Lemmon hopes to change that perception.

Miles away, in distance and daily experience, are the 30 American women profiled in Erin Albert’s Single. Women. Entrepreneurs. Ms. Albert, an assistant pharmacy professor who also runs a consultancy and a networking group for young professionals, said she was inspired to write the book after reading a Kauffman Foundation study that found single, divorced, and widowed women start more businesses than their male counterparts. Additionally, unmarried women outnumber married women for the first time in United States history.

But while much is written about so-called mompreneurs, who are often married, their single sisters are seldom addressed as a group. Ms. Albert set out to explore their strategies, challenges (which include doing without the safety net of a second income), and advantages (like greater flexibility). One of Ms. Albert’s subjects, a South Carolina native, Kristin Cobb, spent a year in New York seeking business inspiration. She returned home and started Cupcake in 2006, after having been exposed to Manhattan’s glut of cupcake shops (the craze had not yet hit South Carolina).

When Babson professors Mary Godwyn and Donna Stoddard began researching Minority Women Entrepreneurs, they hoped merely to highlight the accomplishments of minority female owners who tend to be ignored in business school case studies even though they start businesses at four times the rate of non-minority women and men (the book does not explore the reasons for this disparity). Instead, through interviews with women who self-identified as minority group members, they were surprised to find these business owners, while profit-minded, shared a determination to use socially conscious business practices and rejected the notion that financial and societal goals are mutually exclusive. Because of their outsider status, minority women can more readily see the flaws in doing “business as usual,” said Ms. Godwyn. They are also forced to find innovative solutions, she said, in a world that is often dismissive of their talents.

The women profiled in the book include Judi Henderson-Townsend, president of Mannequin Madness, a company that recycles, sells, rents, and repairs racially diverse mannequins, keeping them out of landfills. The business is the recipient of numerous awards including one from the Environmental Protection Agency for recycling 100,000 pounds of mannequins annually. In the book, Ms. Henderson-Townsend describes a situation in which she decided between expressing her values about racial diversity and possibly offending a client who had chosen eight white mannequins for a lingerie catalog.

Though her husband urged her to “just take the money” and refrain from telling her client how to do business, Ms. Henderson-Townsend spoke up and suggested the customer buy “one mannequin of color.” The client, who was not offended, added mannequins that looked Asian, African-American, and Latina to the order.

Ms. Godwyn said her research made her optimistic that male and female entrepreneurs can learn from the women she interviewed. “What would the world look like,” she asked, “if people held their businesses to both financial and moral standards?”
« Last Edit: March 27, 2011, 04:14:02 PM by Kay » Logged
Jill
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« Reply To This #255 on: March 30, 2011, 07:54:54 AM »

I love stuff like this.

The Diagram Prize just came out, recognizing this past year’s “Oddest Book Titles.

This year’s winner was: Managing a Dental Practice: The Genghis Khan Way

Competitors for the most recent prize or competitors/winners from previous years included the following (and these were real books!):

Baboon Metaphysics

Big Book of Lesbian Horse Stories

If You Want Closure in Your Relationship, Start With Your Legs

The Joy of Chickens

The Madam as Entrepreneur: Career Management in House Prostitution

Living With Crazy Buttocks

If it weren’t still so early and my eyes weren’t feeling quite so heavy, I’d start poring through some of the titles, looking for wacko ones, in my own library, just for the pure pleasure of seeing “old friends” again.  Maybe later….

EDIT:  Some other pretty “out there” titles that someone else tracked down and compiled in a list here

How to Cook Roadkill: Gourmet Cooking

Anorexia Nervosa in Bulgarian Bees

Are Women Human? and Other International Dialogues

How Green Were the Nazis?:Nature, Environment, and Nature in the 3rd Reich

Careers in Dope

Old Age: Its Cause and Prevention

and a whole lot of fun absurd more, given at the link, above.



« Last Edit: March 30, 2011, 08:14:07 AM by Jill » Logged
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« Reply To This #256 on: April 19, 2011, 07:49:24 AM »

  NPR Morning Edition: White-Collar Criminals Weave New 'Tangled Webs'
Listen to the Story April 19, 2011

Lying in politics is hardly a new game, but do people these days lie more than in the past? Author James B. Stewart asks this question in his new book, Tangled Webs, which describes what Stewart calls a surge of concerted, deliberate lying by people at the top of their fields, like Martha Stewart, Bernie Madoff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby and Barry Bonds.

Stewart admits in his book that he can't prove with statistics how much lying and perjury happens, but instead gathers anecdotal evidence from people like prosecutors who view it as an epidemic to the point where they come into work expecting to be lied to day after day. But whether or not it's a quantifiable rise, Stewart says the trend of high-profile cases where the defendant ends up charged not for the original crime but for perjury sends a negative message to the U.S. justice system and the rest of the world.

"Obviously they all thought they had done something wrong, they couldn't admit it, they were going to hide it, and it was easier to lie and cover it up," Stewart tells Morning Edition guest host Mary Louise Kelly. Of the four celebrity cases he examines, Stewart explains that three of them were charged not with the original misdeed, but with lying. ...


Excerpt: 'Tangled Webs'
by James B. Stewart

We know how many murders are committed each year—1,318,398 in 2009. We know the precise numbers for reported instances of rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, and vehicle theft. No one keeps statistics for perjury and false statements—lies told under oath or to investigative and other agencies of the U.S. government—even though they are felonies punishable by up to five years in prison. There is simply too much of it, and too little is prosecuted to generate any meaningful statistics.

Although lying seems to be an inherent part of human nature, the narrow but serious class of lies that undermines the judicial process on which government depends has been a crime as old as civilization itself. Originally prosecuted in England by ecclesiastical courts, by the sixteenth century perjury was firmly embedded as a crime in the English common law. The offender was typically punished by cutting out his tongue, or making him stand with both ears nailed to the pillory. False testimony that resulted in the execution of an innocent person was itself punishable by death. Exile, imprisonment, fines, and "perpetual infamy" were meted out as the centuries passed.

Perjury was a crime in the American colonies and has been a crime in the United States since independence. Today perjury and false statements are federal offenses under U.S. criminal code Title 18, and perjury is also outlawed by statute in all fifty states. The obligation to appear as a witness if summoned and to provide truthful testimony has been inculcated in generations of Americans through civics and history classes. "I swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth" is a phrase nearly every American knows by heart.

Yet lying under oath is a subjective crime. It requires the person telling the lie to know that the statement is false and to intend to lie. The subject of the lie must be "material," of some importance, and not a trivial irrelevancy. Guilt or innocence turns not on accuracy, but on state of mind. For that reason, it is an extremely difficult crime to detect, prosecute, and prove.

Mounting evidence suggests that the broad public commitment to telling the truth under oath has been breaking down, eroding over recent decades, a trend that has been accelerating in recent years. Because there are no statistics, it's impossible to know for certain how much lying afflicts the judicial process, and whether it's worse now than in previous decades. Street criminals have always lied when confronted by law enforcement. But prosecutors have told me repeatedly that a surge of concerted, deliberate lying by a different class of criminal—sophisticated, educated, affluent, and represented in many cases by the best lawyers—threatens to swamp the legal system and undermine the prosecution of white-collar crime. Perjury is committed all too often at the highest levels of business, media, politics, sports, culture—even the legal profession itself—by people celebrated for their achievements, followed avidly by the media, and held up as role models.

This surge of perjury cases at the highest levels of business, politics, media, and culture poses some fundamental questions: Why would people with so much to lose put so much at risk by lying under oath? Whatever they may have done, why would they compound their problems by committing an independent felony, punishable by prison? What were the consequences? And what price are all of us paying for their behavior?

I set out to answer these questions by examining recent cases of perjury by people at the pinnacle of their fields. They come from the worlds of media, business, politics, sports, law, and Wall Street—just about every center of power and influence in American society. They enjoyed money, fame, power, and celebrity to a degree that most people can only dream of. Yet they shattered their lives and those of people around them while inflicting untold damage on society as a whole. I believe that only by exploring these fascinating cases in depth do the answers to my questions emerge.

Most instances of perjury are very difficult to assess, because sworn testimony is often delivered in secrecy, before a grand jury, or as part of a confidential investigation. All of the lies in these cases were told in circumstances that at the time were veiled in secrecy. In each of these cases, I was able to obtain transcripts of such testimony or notes taken by FBI agents or other investigators. They provide a rare look at the very moment these people made the fateful choice to lie.

That a witness will raise his hand, swear to tell the truth, and then do so is a breathtakingly simple proposition on which the entire American legal system rests. These cases tell us what happens when that proposition breaks down.

Excerpted from Tangled Webs by James B. Stewart. Copyright 2011 by James B. Stewart. Excerpted by permission of The Penguin Press. All rights reserved.
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« Reply To This #257 on: April 21, 2011, 09:08:07 AM »

For something a bit lighter and yet, at the same time, not so very light, I commend to you the writing of Tina Fey.  And yes, I probably would vote for her for President if she ever ran because, she, at least, would make me laugh in the midst of all the tears and disappointment it seems that I invariably feel inside whenever anybody becomes President and comes across much less the deeply caring human being I might have hoped and thought they were.

I haven’t, myself, yet read Tina Fey’s newest book, Bossypants, though I have downloaded it onto my Kindle.  This link takes you to an excerpt from it which, I’m thinking, will resonate among all parents and would-be parents of daughters.  What a mind!*




* Think, read, Anne Lamott, as well.


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« Last Edit: April 21, 2011, 09:13:15 AM by Jill » Logged
P, B and J
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« Reply To This #258 on: August 07, 2011, 10:57:01 AM »

I'm not quite sure about where to post the following article; it could fit equally in a number of places I think, but since it has to do with George Orwell to some extent, I figured I'd put it here.  If anyone finds it would better belong elsewhere that's fine too, I could post it wherever you tell me it needs to go.  Smiley  The article, IMHO is excellent, profound.  Also, the author could be writing about poverty and those afflicted, in Canada for that matter.

Quote
On the trail of George Orwell’s outcasts
By Emma Jane Kirby BBC News, Paris and London

"Some 80 years after George Orwell chronicled the lives of the hard-up and destitute in his book Down and Out in Paris and London, what has changed? Retracing the writer's footsteps, Emma Jane Kirby finds the hallmarks of poverty identified by Orwell - addiction, exhaustion and, often, a quiet dignity - are as apparent now as they were then.

"Quarrels, and the desolate cries of street hawkers, and the shouts of children chasing-orange-peel over the cobbles, and at night loud singing and the sour reek of the refuse carts, made up the atmosphere of the street…. Poverty is what I'm writing about and I had my first contact with poverty in this slum."

Such was George Orwell's recollection of what he called the Rue du Coq d'Or in Paris, 1929 - the real-life Rue du Pot de Fer. Today it's pleasure rather than poverty that defines the Latin Quarter that Orwell frequented 80-odd years ago. The chic pavement cafes are full of contented-looking people leisurely sipping their vin rose, and the air is perfumed by the sweet smell of crepes and tourists' money.

But poverty hasn't left Paris - she's simply changed address. She may not look quite the same as she did in the 1920s but if Orwell were to meet her again on these streets, he'd know her straight away. And I doubt he'd find her greatly changed... "

Read the complete article here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-14372195
« Last Edit: August 07, 2011, 11:00:26 AM by P, B and J » Logged
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« Reply To This #259 on: February 05, 2012, 06:25:04 PM »

The dressmakers book is a good one.
I just recently read two which are worth sitting down with. One is I Shall Not Hate by Izzeldin Abuelaish which tells about the Palestinian camps and settlement from the first person perspective of a Doctor who lived there yet worked in Israel and treated both Israelis and Palestinians. It recounts his life there and the deaths of three of his peace-loving daughters. It has heightened my resolve to lend to Palestinian people especially from the camps and Gaza.
Soonafter I bought Little Princes: One Man's Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal
Conor Grennan, and The Good Daughter: A Memoir of My Mother's Hidden Life
Jasmin Darznik. I just finished The Good Daughter - a fast poignant read about Iranian families and culture. I will start the Little Princes tonight.

Colleen

 


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« Last Edit: February 05, 2012, 06:43:17 PM by CelticHarpist » Logged
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